Trees Have a Heartbeat – Lidar Proves It

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Trees Have a Heartbeat

Scientist Diana Beresford Kroeger proved that the biochemistry of humans and that of plants and trees are the same – ie the hormones (including serotonin) that regulate human and plant life are identical. What this means practically is that trees possess all the elements they need to develop a mind and consciousness. If mind and awareness are possibilities/probabilities then my next question isn’t absurd: Do trees have a heartbeat?

From an article in Sun Journal by Sara Wright.

According to studies done in Hungary and Denmark (Zlinszky/Molnar/Barfod) in 2017 trees do in fact have a special type of pulse within them which resembles that of a heartbeat.

To find this hidden heartbeat, these researchers used advanced monitoring techniques known as terrestrial laser scanning to survey the movement of twenty two different types to see how the shape of their canopies changed.

The measurements were taken in greenhouses at night to rule out sun and wind as factors in the trees’ movements.

In several of the trees, branches moved up and down by about a centimeter or so every couple of hours.

After studying the nocturnal tree activity, the researchers came up with a theory about what the movement means. They believe the motion is an indication that trees are pumping water up from their roots. It is, in essence, a type of ‘heartbeat.’ These results shocked everyone. At night, while the trees were resting slow and steady pulses pumped and distributed water throughout the tree body just as a human heart pumps blood. It has been assumed that trees distribute water via osmosis (a process that defies gravity and never made sense to me) but this and other new finding suggests otherwise.

Scientists have discovered the trunks and branches of trees are actually contracting and expanding to ‘pump’ water through the trees, similar to the way our hearts pump blood through our bodies. They suggest that the trunk gently squeezes the water, pushing it upwards through the xylem, a system of tissue in the trunk whose main job is to transport water and nutrients from roots to shoots and leaves.

But what “organ” generates the pulse?

Recently forest science researchers have found that the pulse is mostly generated by diameter fluctuations in the bark only. This was somewhat surprising, as traditionally it was thought that bark is totally decoupled from the transpiration stream of the tree. To better understand this mysterious situation, we need to have a closer look at bark.

For the complete article click here.

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This entry was posted in 3D Modeling, Agriculture, Data, Environmental, Forestry, Laser Scanning, Lidar, point clouds, remote sensing, Research and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Trees Have a Heartbeat – Lidar Proves It

  1. John says:

    This research reminds me of Luther Burbank and others plant studies

  2. Nikolas Bielski says:

    A poorly written post with paragraphs repeated. Also, I thought this was a scientific blog. Has their research been peer reviewed and published? Else why share this?

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    From Gene Roe – Nikolas, I apologize for the errors with the text repeating. That has been updated.

    We are not a scientific blog, however I try to share research that may be of general interest to a wide audience, not just those looking for peer reviewed articles. I think it is quite obvious that this bog does not meet those standards. I don’t know of any blog that does.

    I referred the reader to the complete article so that they can determine what value to place on the research findings.

    Thank you for your interest.

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