Skanska is Using 3D Laser Scanning to Inform and Connect

Skanska, one of the world’s largest construction firms has intergrated 3D laser scanning into their core workflows and that of their subcontractors.

Image of site Skanska Uses Scanning, Photography and Videography

Skanska Uses Scanning, Photography and Videography

This is from an article in The Architects Newspaper.

The Swedish multinational construction and development company Skanska is responsible for many of the world’s biggest building projects. Right now in New York City alone, it is overseeing two massive infrastructural and architectural undertakings: The Moynihan Train Hall and the LaGuardia Terminal B redevelopment.

The design and construction of these projects are being reshaped by the latest technology, particularly when it comes to “reality capture”—laser scanning, drones, 360 photography, virtual reality, and other technologies that are all becoming powerful, scalable, affordable, and interoperable. AN and Tech+ Expo spoke with Skanska’s Tony Colonna, Senior Vice President of Innovative Construction Solutions and Albert Zulps, Regional Director, Virtual Design and Construction to get their insight into how technology is shaping projects today.

Skanska’s 3D laser scanning has been especially useful on projects like the Moynihan Train Hall where there is existing construction. “At Moynihan, we went down into the catacombs, into the tunnels below, the train tracks below,” explained Zulps. “Getting access through Amtrak is limited to weekends, after hours, late at night. To bring all the subcontractors and people that have an interest will be putting systems in there eventually, it is pretty difficult.”

Instead of trying to cram everyone underground at inconvenient hours and to mitigate problems of limited access, Skanska 3D scanned the entire job site and shared between subcontractors, architects, engineers, and others the resulting 3D model that could be imported into software like Revit and Navisworks. This interoperability and ease of use, along with significantly reduced cost, have turned laser scanning from a pricey gimmick into an almost necessary tool. “There’s a right time and place for technology, and both Moynihan and La Guardia are benefited by that,” said Zulps.

“These subcontractors—if they didn’t have a scan, they would have to go down individually on their own to these different spaces, take measurements, make their own assumptions,” he said. “This gives them that information, and it gives it to them on day one. There’s no one or two weeks of doing pipe measurements and drawings to figure out what you’re doing. And that actually allows you to compress the schedule a bit.”

Laser scanning existing structures helps the design and construction teams evaluate inaccuracies in historic plans, as well as account for any shifts that might have happened in the intervening years. In the case of Moynihan Train Hall, Colonna said: “We were going gut it, bring it down to its bones, and then refit out. The plans that the architects were using were not actually what was there. So once we stripped it down, we went in and we did a three-dimensional laser scan, we put that into a model, and then when you overlay that with models that the architects had, you could see the differences in some of the structures. Some of the columns weren’t where they thought they were.”

For the full article click here.

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This entry was posted in 3D Modeling, AI, BIM, Business Development, Construction, Data, Hardware, Indoor Mapping, Infrastructure, Inspection, Laser Scanning, Sensors, Software, Surveying, Surveying Engineering, virtual reality, Visualization and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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