Regulating Drones: What Makes a Good Drone Law?

Regulating drones and new technologies, in general,  has always been a cumbersome task for authorities. This important article takes a detailed look at what makes a good drone law.

Table for Regulating Drones

Regulating Drones

From an article in DroneII.com by Millie Radovic

Regulations must encompass technological leaps at the same time as they occur, and innovation is much faster than bureaucracy. Striking the balance between responsible and facilitating drone regulation is difficult, and various countries have taken very different approaches.

Continuous dialogue between regulators and drone industry stakeholders are crucial, and at Drone Industry Insights we’ve had the unique privilege of getting to know what both ends of the spectrum think. This qualitative understanding of the drone industry has helped us build a quantitative metric of a country’s preparedness for the current and future development of commercial drones – the Drone Readiness Index.

What goes into such an index? How do we determine whether a country is ‘ready’ for the current and continued development of commercial drones? There are six key factors that are crucial to a good drone regulation: applicability, human resources, administrative infrastructure, operational limitations, airspace integration, and social acceptance.

Applicability

Not all countries in the world have drone regulations. Some have laws specifically dedicated to drones, some have adapted their general aviation regulations to include drones, and other make no reference to unmanned aircraft at all. A reference to drones in aviation legislation is the bare minimum a government must do to qualify as ‘ready’ for the current and future development of drones.

When examining laws we also look for context. Legislation made four years ago but untouched since is likely to be outdated. Given the dynamic pace at which the industry is growing, it’s crucial to examine whether the drone regulations have been regularly updated. Continuous revisions reflect the government and bureaucratic apparatus’ willingness and drive to grow the drone market by continuing to address the emerging regulatory challenges in the commercial drone space.

For the complete article click here.

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