Measuring Pedestrian Traffic

Graduate student Justin Miller and undergrad Wally Wibowo of the Aerospace Controls Lab working on vehicles outfitted with sensors that match those of self-driving cars. This work is part of the Ford-MIT Alliance and aims to predict pedestrian behaviors on short time-scales while also providing data to support a mobility-on-demand system for the MIT campus."

Graduate student Justin Miller and undergrad Wally Wibowo of the Aerospace Controls Lab working on vehicles outfitted with sensors that match those of self-driving cars. This work is part of the Ford-MIT Alliance and aims to predict pedestrian behaviors on short time-scales while also providing data to support a mobility-on-demand system for the MIT campus.”

Ford Motor Company has joined forces with MIT to use lidar and cameras to measure pedestrian traffic and predict demand for on-demand electric shuttles.

The project will introduce a fleet of on-demand electric vehicle shuttles that operate on both city roads and campus walkways on the university’s Cambridge, Massachusetts, campus. The vehicles use LiDAR sensors and cameras to measure pedestrian flow, which ultimately helps predict demand for the shuttles. This, in turn, helps researchers and drivers route shuttles toward areas with the highest demand to better accommodate riders.

“The onboard sensors and cameras gather pedestrian data to estimate the flow of foot traffic,” said Ken Washington, vice president of Research and Advanced Engineering at Ford. “This helps us develop efficient algorithms that bring together relevant data. It improves mobility-on-demand services, and aids ongoing pedestrian detection and mapping efforts for autonomous vehicle research.”

Ford and MIT researchers plan to introduce the service to a group of students and faculty beginning in September. This group will use a mobile application to hail one of three electric urban vehicles to their location and request to be dropped off at another destination on campus.

During the past five months, Ford and MIT have used LiDAR sensors and cameras mounted to the vehicles to document pedestrian flow between different points on campus. LiDAR is the most efficient way to detect and localize objects from the environment surrounding the shuttles. The technology is much more accurate than GPS, emitting short pulses of laser light to precisely pinpoint the vehicles’ location on a map and detect the movement of nearby pedestrians and objects.

 

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