3D Technology Used to Perform Middle Ear Transplant

A South African doctor and his team successfully pioneered a transplant of a patient’s middle ear using 3D technology to cure his deafness, making it the first in the world. This groundbreaking procedure offers hope to many of those who suffer from loss of hearing.

image of 3D Technology Used to Transplant Middle Ear

3D Technology Used to Transplant Middle Ear

From an article in The Epoch Times.

The first patient to receive the transplant was a 35-year-old man who suffered hearing loss as a result of a car accident that damaged his inner ear, according to a press release by the South African Government. The operation was performed by Professor Mashudu Tshifularo and his team from the University of Pretoria (UP) Faculty of Health at the Steve Biko Academic hospital in Pretoria on March 13. Using 3D technology, he was able to recreate the bones—the hammer, anvil, stirrup, and the ossicles that make up the inner ear, thus replacing the damaged ones.

The surgery was successfully completed in one and a half hours, owing to the severity of the injury, according to a report by the Legit.

Alluding to when the patient will be able to get their hearing back, Tshifularo said: “The patients will get their hearing back immediately but since they will be wrapped in bandages, only after two weeks, when they are removed, will they be able to tell a difference.”

“By replacing only the ossicles that aren’t functioning properly, the procedure carries significantly less risk than known prostheses and their associated surgical procedures. We will use titanium for this procedure, which is biocompatible. We use an endoscope to do the replacement, so the transplant is expected to be quick, with minimal scarring,” explained Tshifularo.

The best part about the surgery is that it will be available to patients of all ages, from newborns to the elderly.

Professor Tshifularo has focused his Ph.D. over the last decade on conductive hearing loss and came up with the idea of using 3D technology to recreate any of the inner ear bones that may be damaged, thus restoring a patient’s hearing.

For the entire article click here.

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