Eye Focusing Lidar

Imagine being able to point a lidar sensor at a specific region in a scene by simply looking at it with your eyes. Amazing.

Editor’s Note: It seems as though I misinterpreted the capability of this sensor. It is not controlled by the eye, but it mimics the way the eye is able to focus in on a specific region at a higher resolution. My apologies for the confusion.

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component.

Its not clear to me how it interacts with the eye, but I am sure that is my lack of understanding.

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf
Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Posted in Research, Sensors | 1 Comment

Two New UAS Lidar Systems Announced

Phoenix Aerial Systems, a leading manufacturer of unmanned aerial LiDAR products, announced today two new revolutionary LiDAR products, the Scout and the Ranger.The Scout uses the new Velodyne Puck and the Ranger is based on Riegl’s VUX-1.

The Scout is a lightweight, accurate and low cost solution for companies looking to enter the mapping market. Weighing less than 2.5kg, measuring only 12cm x 22cm x 8cm and options starting at $55k, the Scout is the most affordable UAV LiDAR mapping solution on the market.

“The Ranger is by far the most accurate and longest range LiDAR mapping system we offer,” said Omans. “Its ideal for mapping power lines, pipelines, railway tracks and anything else where accuracy is essential.” No price was quoted for the Ranger.

Posted in airborne LiDAR, UAVs | 2 Comments

Physical Reality for King Tut Tomb

A few weeks ago I mentioned the Factum-Arte group. Here is a link to a story on their work to create an exact replica of King Tut’s tomb using 3D laser scanning and printing. This project took over 5 years and will allow conservation of the original.

Presenting the show, Rajan Datar said: “This is the future of cultural tourism. During the past hundred years many antiquities have been exposed to too much human presence and unless that is restricted they are going to collapse completely. The mindset has to change amongst tourists.”

There is also an exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, UK, ‘Discovering Tutankhamun’ will showcase some of Howard Carter’s original records, drawings and photographs. It runs from 24th July to 2nd November 2014.

Posted in 3D Modeling, 3D Printing, cultural heritage, Historic Preservation | Leave a comment

Day and Night

In reflecting this past week on the changes that have taken place in the practice of surveying it is truly incredible how 3D technology and in particular laser scanning has changed the game. Not that long ago all the decisions about what  data to collect were made in the field. Designers and other office professionals had to rely on the skill of the party chief to obtain the correct information, but compared to an accurate 3D point cloud of the as-found conditions they were “running blind.”

Yet despite this most of the Built Environment that we see today was created without the benefit of 3D. It will be interesting to see where we go from here.

Posted in 3D Modeling, Technology, The Industry | Leave a comment

Gold and Lidar

This financial statement includes a reference to the use of Lidar in the search for gold in Nevada and Utah. The lidar surveys are being used in conjunction with the use of geophysical surveys and on the ground drilling programs.

They actually include a couple of paragraphs explaining lidar technology. It’s an interesting look inside the gold prospecting business.

Posted in Mapping | Leave a comment

High Accuracy NIST LADAR

NIST has announced the capability to scan objects at a very high level of accuracy. It’s a highly specialized technology that is described as follows:

“Operating with laser power of just 9 milliwatts—which is safe for the eyes at the instrument’s infrared wavelength—NIST’s 3D mapping system scans a target object point by point across a grid, measuring the distance to each point. The system uses the distance data to make a 3D image of about 1 million pixels in less than 8.5 minutes at the current scanning rate. Distances to points on a rough surface that reflects light in many directions can be determined to within 10 micrometers in half a millisecond, with an accuracy that is traceable to a frequency standard.”

They believe the technology may be useful in diverse fields, including precision machining and assembly, as well as in forensics.

Posted in Metrology, Research, Sensors | Leave a comment

“Close Enough” Webinar is Next Week

In the good old days the most important practical surveying lesson you could learn was how to know when things were “close enough.” That was the party chief’s job which I was thinking about this week at the recently concluded FARO 3D conference.

Times have certainly changed. Now the field work can be accomplished with a scanner and as Jonathon Coco explained “someone who’s main talent is to not drop the scanner.” Knowing if things are close enough is now determined in the office and it requires a lot of training to make that call.

If you want to hear from a creative, pushing the envelope 3D guru then be sure to sign up for next week’s “Close Enough – Providing Clients with What They Want” webinar where Jonathan and I will discuss a number of case studies that focus on innovative approaches to meeting client’s needs. The webinar, sponsored by FARO  is Thursday, October 23 at 1 PM EDT. You can register here.

Please help is to pass the word.

Posted in Education, training | Leave a comment

What is Reality Computing?

One of the keynotes today at FARO 3D was by Aaron Morris from Autodesk on reality computing. I have a fuzzy idea of what he is talking about, but as I told him I really don’t get it. I want them to answer the question, “What is reality computing and more importantly why should I care?”

One place where we  will hopefully be able to get the answer to that question is at their just announced conference REAL 2015. Stay tuned for more on this new conference entry.

The other keynote speeches  at FARO 3D today provided basic overviews on historic preservation, forensics and the making of films/commercials. The afternoon breakout sessions were much more interesting including a session on marine applications, building documentation and large building construction projects.

Posted in 3D Modeling, Conferences, cultural heritage, Historic Preservation, Technology | Leave a comment

FARO 3D Opening Keynotes

Jay Freeland, President and CEO of FARO Technologies opened the 2014 3D Conference with an overview of some 12 markets where FARO is a key player. Although he did not have any new products to  announce he noted that they are working on five BIG picture concept areas:

  1. Greater mobility
  2. More portability
  3. Greater ease of use
  4. Total cost of ownership
  5. Personalization in the form of applications

In case you missed it earlier this year FARO did acquire The CAD Zone. For more than 20 years, Crash Zone and Crime Zone have provided investigators with the easiest, most comprehensive tools for creating courtroom-ready diagrams and animations.

 

 

 

Posted in 3D Modeling, Business Development, Conferences | Leave a comment

FARO 3D Documentation Conference 2014

I am off to the FARO 3D Documentation Conference in sunny Orlando, Florida. This was a very focused educational event that was also a great opportunity to network and have some fun as well. It runs through the 15th.

The tracks include accident reconstruction, AEC, energy, historic preservation and ship building as well as keynotes and new product news. I hope to see you there. Stay tuned for the latest news.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Conferences, cultural heritage, Entertainment, Historic Preservation, Software | Leave a comment