OSU Has Marine Geomatics Faculty Opening

The School of Civil and Construction Engineering (CCE) at Oregon State University has an opening for new faculty member in their rapidly growing program. It is a full time, tenure track position in the newly launched Marine Studies Initiative.

The successful candidate will demonstrate the abilities to teach and conduct research in the area of marine geomatics engineering. The candidate will have expertise in one or more of the following: real-time networks, precise point positioning, GNSS\GPS signal modeling, interferometric synthetic aperture radar, navigation, geoids and gravity fields, tidal measurements and datums, bathymetric mapping, hydrographic surveying, and/or geodetic reference frames.

They are building an impressive Geomatics program at OSU. Kudos to all involved.

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Close Enough Webinar is Today

In case you are not aware LiDAR News is hosting a webinar today (October 23, 2014) beginning at 1 PM EDT entitled, “Close Enough – Providing Clients with What They Want.” You can register here.

Industry guru Jonathon Coco will explain how he balances industry best practices with clients needs and tight project budgets on a number of very challenging 3D laser scanning projects. I am sure you will come away with insights that you can put to work on your next project.

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Solid, Photo-realistc Point Clouds

Euclideon claims their Solidscan software for interpreting and streaming laser point clouds does not natively ‘interpolate’ points – instead, it uses a 3D carving technique to produce solid photo-realistic point clouds with no holes.

“This is not ‘meshing’ or photogrammetry,” said Euclideon CEO, Bruce Dell. “Instead, we have invented a completely new method that uses 3D objects with volume called ‘Atoms.’

“There is no upper limit to the detail that can be reproduced using Solidscan. A 3 terabyte Solidscan file can open and stream at the same speed as a 3 megabyte one.”

Additionally, Solidscan removes moving objects and noise from laser scanned data – leaving only static objects. Reflective surfaces like whiteboards and mirrors can now be laser scanned with photo-realistic results.

Posted in Software | 1 Comment

Eye Focusing Lidar

Imagine being able to point a lidar sensor at a specific region in a scene by simply looking at it with your eyes. Amazing.

Editor’s Note: It seems as though I misinterpreted the capability of this sensor. It is not controlled by the eye, but it mimics the way the eye is able to focus in on a specific region at a higher resolution. My apologies for the confusion.

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component.

Its not clear to me how it interacts with the eye, but I am sure that is my lack of understanding.

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf
Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a 3D laser scanner with a light-travel time-measurement system based on the human eye and that can focus on key sections of an image and capture them with a correspondingly higher resolution. The system functions independently of ambient light and delivers high-quality 3D information in real time, even over greater distances. A novel MEMS scanning technology developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden is the key hardware component. – See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/vision-2014-distant-viewing-in-real-time-with-mems-based-3d-laser-scanning-technology_N3216.html#sthash.h9RbZaGn.dpuf

Posted in Research, Sensors | 1 Comment

Two New UAS Lidar Systems Announced

Phoenix Aerial Systems, a leading manufacturer of unmanned aerial LiDAR products, announced today two new revolutionary LiDAR products, the Scout and the Ranger.The Scout uses the new Velodyne Puck and the Ranger is based on Riegl’s VUX-1.

The Scout is a lightweight, accurate and low cost solution for companies looking to enter the mapping market. Weighing less than 2.5kg, measuring only 12cm x 22cm x 8cm and options starting at $55k, the Scout is the most affordable UAV LiDAR mapping solution on the market.

“The Ranger is by far the most accurate and longest range LiDAR mapping system we offer,” said Omans. “Its ideal for mapping power lines, pipelines, railway tracks and anything else where accuracy is essential.” No price was quoted for the Ranger.

Posted in airborne LiDAR, UAVs | 2 Comments

Physical Reality for King Tut Tomb

A few weeks ago I mentioned the Factum-Arte group. Here is a link to a story on their work to create an exact replica of King Tut’s tomb using 3D laser scanning and printing. This project took over 5 years and will allow conservation of the original.

Presenting the show, Rajan Datar said: “This is the future of cultural tourism. During the past hundred years many antiquities have been exposed to too much human presence and unless that is restricted they are going to collapse completely. The mindset has to change amongst tourists.”

There is also an exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, UK, ‘Discovering Tutankhamun’ will showcase some of Howard Carter’s original records, drawings and photographs. It runs from 24th July to 2nd November 2014.

Posted in 3D Modeling, 3D Printing, cultural heritage, Historic Preservation | Leave a comment

Day and Night

In reflecting this past week on the changes that have taken place in the practice of surveying it is truly incredible how 3D technology and in particular laser scanning has changed the game. Not that long ago all the decisions about what  data to collect were made in the field. Designers and other office professionals had to rely on the skill of the party chief to obtain the correct information, but compared to an accurate 3D point cloud of the as-found conditions they were “running blind.”

Yet despite this most of the Built Environment that we see today was created without the benefit of 3D. It will be interesting to see where we go from here.

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Gold and Lidar

This financial statement includes a reference to the use of Lidar in the search for gold in Nevada and Utah. The lidar surveys are being used in conjunction with the use of geophysical surveys and on the ground drilling programs.

They actually include a couple of paragraphs explaining lidar technology. It’s an interesting look inside the gold prospecting business.

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High Accuracy NIST LADAR

NIST has announced the capability to scan objects at a very high level of accuracy. It’s a highly specialized technology that is described as follows:

“Operating with laser power of just 9 milliwatts—which is safe for the eyes at the instrument’s infrared wavelength—NIST’s 3D mapping system scans a target object point by point across a grid, measuring the distance to each point. The system uses the distance data to make a 3D image of about 1 million pixels in less than 8.5 minutes at the current scanning rate. Distances to points on a rough surface that reflects light in many directions can be determined to within 10 micrometers in half a millisecond, with an accuracy that is traceable to a frequency standard.”

They believe the technology may be useful in diverse fields, including precision machining and assembly, as well as in forensics.

Posted in Metrology, Research, Sensors | Leave a comment

“Close Enough” Webinar is Next Week

In the good old days the most important practical surveying lesson you could learn was how to know when things were “close enough.” That was the party chief’s job which I was thinking about this week at the recently concluded FARO 3D conference.

Times have certainly changed. Now the field work can be accomplished with a scanner and as Jonathon Coco explained “someone who’s main talent is to not drop the scanner.” Knowing if things are close enough is now determined in the office and it requires a lot of training to make that call.

If you want to hear from a creative, pushing the envelope 3D guru then be sure to sign up for next week’s “Close Enough – Providing Clients with What They Want” webinar where Jonathan and I will discuss a number of case studies that focus on innovative approaches to meeting client’s needs. The webinar, sponsored by FARO  is Thursday, October 23 at 1 PM EDT. You can register here.

Please help is to pass the word.

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